Saturday, January 21, 2006

Georgetown 87, Duke 84, The Geek Recap

Below are the efficiency numbers for Duke players during the time they spent on and off the court:

Player

Off. Poss.


Off. PPP

Def. Poss.

Def. PPP

Paulus-on

64.5


1.16

65.5

1.19

Paulus-off

4.5


2.00

4.5

2.00

Redick-on

69


1.22

70

1.24

Redick-off






Dockery-on

64.5


1.26

66.5

1.25

Dockery-off

4.5


0.67

3.5

1.14

McRoberts-on

18.5


1.62

18.5

1.95

McRoberts-off

50.5


1.07

51.5

0.99

Williams-on

58


1.09

56.5

1.27

Williams-off

11


1.91

13.5

1.11

Melchionni-on

63.5


1.17

63

1.11

Melchionni-off

5.5


1.82

7

2.43

Pocius-on

4


1.50

4

0.75

Pocius-off

65


1.20

66

1.27

Boykin-on

3


2.33

6

1.00

Boykin-off

66


1.17

64

1.27

Team Totals

69


1.22

70

1.24


Notable here is McRoberts - Georgetown scored 36 points in the 18.5 defensive possessions he was on the floor. That's just awful. Now obviously, there are four other guys on the court, but those four guys were also generally on the court during the 51.5 possessions McRoberts sat, and Duke held Georgetown to "just" 51 points during that time. This has been a noticable trend since I started charting these numbers. For example, in this game and the Clemson game, he was on defense for under 30% of the total possessions, but the teams scored over 42% of their points during that time. No other Duke player has anywhere near that discrepancy. As I said in the Naked Eye, it's a shame his defense is so bad, because he really helps us on the offensive end of the floor - on the season, we're more efficient with him in there.

If you want a short, statistical explanation of how this game was played, the assisted basket ratio covers it quite nicely. Georgetown shared and shared alike - 24 assists on 32 made hoops for a 75% AB ratio. Duke watched JJ Redick - only 11 dimes on 30 made baskets for a paltry 36.7% AB ratio.

Of course, his teammates did watch Redick put on one heck of a show. He got his 41 points courtesy of a 67.9% true shooting percentage (Points/[2*(FGA + 0.475*FTA)]). True shooting percentage eliminates the bias in regular shooting percentage by giving 3 pointers more weight and also gives credit to a player's performance from the free throw line. Needless to say, 68% is damn good - if he had made only 2 point baskets (no threes or free throws) his shooting line would have had to be about 20 for 30 to match this performance. Simply amazing. Toss in his three assists, and he accounted for over half of Duke's points today. Another All-American caliber performance from Redick today.

1 comment:

Luis Villa said...

Great chart. Thanks, Paul.